DLA Aviation shows veterans some love

By Army Sgt. Saul Rosa, DLA Aviation Public Affairs

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Love comes in many forms and with the coming of Valentine’s Day we are reminded of this and we feel with the need to show it. Members of Defense Logistics Agency Aviation showed their love for the veteran community February 10 at the Hunter Holmes Veteran Administration McGuire VA Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia. 

DLA Aviation military members from Defense Supply Center Richmond, Virginia, delivered handmade valentines that were made from children at the Betty Ackerman-Cobb Child Development Center on post, and hung them along the walls in the medical center’s atrium. These “valentines for veterans” support the medical center’s annual Salute to Veterans Week which honors veterans through a week of music from live bands and celebrations. Salute to Veterans Week is an opportunity to pay tribute and express appreciation to veterans; increase community awareness of the role of the VA medical center; and encourage citizens to visit hospitalized veterans and to become involved as volunteers.

“We all come from the same walk in life,” said Army Maj. Alex Shimabukuro. “We all start as service members and we earn the honor of becoming veterans, so I want to show them that they are still part of our community, even if they don’t wear the uniform anymore. I want to show that we, as a community, still care about them.”

As the wall is filled with cards, made by children at the child development center on DSCR, employees from McGuire’s Voluntary Services were happy to see the impact it would have on the veterans.

“It helps us and it helps the veterans,” said Janell V. Giles, voluntary service specialist at McGuire’s Voluntary Services. “We try to do things that will brighten up their day, so when they see you putting up the cards, it shows [them] all of the nice sentiments that people have sent in.”

As Valentine’s Day comes, remember that love can extend beyond a significant other and consider becoming more involved in the community.

“It’s just joy and unity to show support to the patients,” said Giles. “We have some people here from another state, who don’t have family here, so just bringing people in to interact with them and show that someone is here for them is impactful.”