Police Week 2018 Spotlight: Officer Anthony Patterson

By DLA Aviation Public Affairs Office

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National Police Week takes place May 13 – 19 in 2018. As part of Police Week observances, Defense Logistics Agency Aviation and DLA Installation Operations at Richmond, Virginia, spotlight Officer Anthony Patterson, who selflessly secures and protects Defense Supply Center Richmond, its people and our neighbors every day.

According to policeweek.org, President John F. Kennedy proclaimed and designated May 15, 1962 as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as Police Week. Events have been celebrated since that time to honor police officers who have paid the ultimate sacrifice to serve and protect our nation’s communities.

 

Name: Anthony Patterson

 

How long have you been in law enforcement (all together and at DSCR)?

Approximately 25 years. I’m a retired Petersburg police officer. I’ve been at DSCR for three months.

 

What made you decide to go into law enforcement and public service?

It was an easy transition to go from the military to law enforcement. As a child it was engraved into me to give back with both parents being pastors.   

 

What is your most memorable event from your job as a police officer?

Working undercover for three years. Waking up every day and having to reinvent myself was very exciting.

 

What is your greatest achievement on the job?

Being promoted and supervising a vice and narcotics unit at a former precinct I worked at.  

 

What’s the most rewarding thing about being a police officer?

Being able to go into the less fortunate areas of the city and provide families Thanksgiving meals and Christmas gifts.

 

Have you had any mentors in your career? If so, how have/did they help?

I’ve had plenty of mentors but one stands out. Detective Marion Reed, who I worked with in another department, was the best. She is no longer with us today, but I owe a great deal to her for helping me to be a good officer. Quick story: I was a new homicide detective and got my first call at 2 a.m. Detective Reed was assigned to be my forensic detective. Upon my arrival on scene, I noticed several items in the area and instructed her to collect and process the items.

 

She collected all the items in a professional manner. After the suspect was arrested and prosecuted a year and a half later, Detective Reed came to me when she felt I was mature enough and asked did I remember the case where I asked her to collect and process the entire “complex.” I said “yes,” laughing.

 

She said those items weren’t evidence, it was only trash. She said she discarded those items as soon as she found a trash can. I still laugh about it, today. She was a great mentor in many ways.

How do you define excellence (as related to being a LEO)?

For me, being in excellent physical condition, being a great shot (firearm) and being a student of your craft. That’s excellence to me.

 

What makes for a great day on the job?

When someone comes to the gate here at DSCR and they appear a little down. I can make them smile by the time they drive on into the gate.

 

What would you say to someone to encourage them to go into public service?

If you’re someone who likes to help, public service is for you. This quote says it all: When you feel like you’re drowning in life, don’t worry your Lifeguard walks on water.” Just replace Lifeguard with public service.