Furnishings ‘check out’ of old lodging facility

By Timothy Hoyle DLA Disposition Services

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With the end of summer came the transition from the Marine Corps’ old Temporary Lodging Facility at Iwakuni, Japan, as furniture and other items not needed for the new building made their way to their temporary lodging at DLA Disposition Services.

Site Manager Llewellyn K. Castro Sr. said nine separate appointment dates and times were provided, which came to 26 hours spent DLA Disposition Services staff just receiving this property from Marine Corps Community Services. Service contactors could only work certain days of the week the process went a bit slower.

“We lucked out with regards to scheduling appointments as it during this time it was pretty slow on turn ins,” Castro said. “We were able to open the schedule up to MCCS … While still taking care of other local customers and their needs.” 

Periodically, receivers were forced to work two appointments at a time, but Castro said they were up to the task and the staff remained poised throughout the extra efforts needed.

“If anyone was directly affected it would be our receivers, who were a bit overwhelmed at first glance of the vehicles and the amount of furniture they carrying,” Castro said. “As soon as the back doors of those trucks opened they were taking charge and directing the flow. They definitely rose to the challenge.”

Temporary lodgers themselves, some items have already moved on through reutilization to serve new owners.  Castro said the biggest ticket items have been the 24 refrigerators received on record, which were all issued by Sept. 22.

“We feel pretty confident in that most of if not all of the property Iwakuni has or will receive onto its accountable records will either be reutilized or sold,” Castro said. “A good portion of the furniture has been shipped to DLA Disposition Services at Sagami for receipt as Iwakuni is not big enough to accommodate receipt of all TLF property on site.”

Castro said an arm chair and some the couches and were scrapped because of their condition.