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News | March 14, 2017

Air Force Brig. Gen. Allan Day bridges the gap for future commanders to DLA

By Army Sgt. Saul Rosa DLA Aviation Public Affairs

Bridging the gap for Army commanders and the role of Defense Logistics Agency, Air Force Brig. Gen. Allan Day, DLA Aviation commander, served as a guest speaker for the Army Logistics University, Logistics Pre-command Course March 2 at Fort Lee, Virginia.

According to the class curriculum, the pre-command course includes the nature and peculiarities of the mission, installation, or facility to be commanded; manpower management; labor relations and human resources; public affairs relationships, Department of Defense financial management and funding system; installation contract administration, service and DOD levels; morale, welfare and recreation programs; and analytical techniques used in the decision-making process.

Day shared his technical experience and knowledge of the organization to help the graduating future commanders better understand how DLA can assist with their assignments and mission goals.

“One of the key things that we put on every slide at DLA is ‘Warfighter First.’ It comes first on our list of what’s important to us,” said Day.  

After explaining what DLA is and how the organization supports the Army, Day, who is pursuing his doctorate in organizational leadership, shared his personal passion, experience, and theories in leadership and followership with the class. Day left a book list with the students that reflects his personal leadership style and opinions.

“If you are going to solve the problems that are in front of us today, then you need to think a different way,” said Day. “As we go through our careers we may face a similar problem, but if you’ve read a few more books then you can come at from a different angle with a different thought process.”

Day posed a question to the graduating class challenging conventional leadership.

“Do your people follow you or the purpose of the organization?” asked Day. He explained that if followers were focused on the purpose and goals of the organization rather than leaders, then the followers would be more empowered and focused on the success of the organization. These type of empowered followers would then be able to engage fellow followers and leaders to drive harder to their common purpose. He also urged the future commanders to not “be a lid” on their organizations. 

“Leadership Lid is a concept that if you have to have everything go through you, then you become a lid for your organization,” said Day. “However, if you are able to engage and leverage the wisdom of everyone else, then you have limitless potential.” 

Bridging the gap for Army commanders and the role of Defense Logistics Agency, Air Force Brig. Gen. Allan Day, DLA Aviation commander, served as a guest speaker for the Army Logistics University, Logistics Pre-command Course March 2 at Fort Lee, Virginia.

According to the class curriculum, the pre-command course includes the nature and peculiarities of the mission, installation, or facility to be commanded; manpower management; labor relations and human resources; public affairs relationships, Department of Defense financial management and funding system; installation contract administration, service and DOD levels; morale, welfare and recreation programs; and analytical techniques used in the decision-making process.

Day shared his technical experience and knowledge of the organization to help the graduating future commanders better understand how DLA can assist with their assignments and mission goals.

“One of the key things that we put on every slide at DLA is ‘Warfighter First.’ It comes first on our list of what’s important to us,” said Day.  

After explaining what DLA is and how the organization supports the Army, Day, who is pursuing his doctorate in organizational leadership, shared his personal passion, experience, and theories in leadership and followership with the class. Day left a book list with the students that reflects his personal leadership style and opinions.

“If you are going to solve the problems that are in front of us today, then you need to think a different way,” said Day. “As we go through our careers we may face a similar problem, but if you’ve read a few more books then you can come at from a different angle with a different thought process.”

Day posed a question to the graduating class challenging conventional leadership.

“Do your people follow you or the purpose of the organization?” asked Day. He explained that if followers were focused on the purpose and goals of the organization rather than leaders, then the followers would be more empowered and focused on the success of the organization. These type of empowered followers would then be able to engage fellow followers and leaders to drive harder to their common purpose. He also urged the future commanders to not “be a lid” on their organizations. 

“Leadership Lid is a concept that if you have to have everything go through you, then you become a lid for your organization,” said Day. “However, if you are able to engage and leverage the wisdom of everyone else, then you have limitless potential.”