Search and rescue success

By Jeff Landenberger DLA Disposition Services Public Affairs

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After hours of searching the family of an 86 year old man suffering from Alzheimer’s called the Seminole, Oklahoma Police Department for help.

A family member stated that the man goes out each morning but is usually back in about 20 minutes. But that day he had gone out a gate and just keep walking.

Police officer stands in front of Humvee.
Police Officer William Younger of the Seminole, Oklahoma Police Department stands in frount of the Humvee that he and Chief David Hansen used to find a missing man suffering from Alzheimer’s. The Humvee came from DLA Disposition Services’ Law Enforcement Support Office.
Police officer stands in front of Humvee.
Officer William Younger
Police Officer William Younger of the Seminole, Oklahoma Police Department stands in frount of the Humvee that he and Chief David Hansen used to find a missing man suffering from Alzheimer’s. The Humvee came from DLA Disposition Services’ Law Enforcement Support Office.
Photo By: Courtesy photo by Seminole, Oklahoma Police Department
VIRIN: 191010-O-DO441-0001
Police Chief David Hansen responded to the call, he took his departments disaster-response Humvee that had been acquired from DLA Disposition Services’ through the LESO program.

While Hansen drove the Humvee over rough terrain keep his eyes on the way forward, Office William Younger rode in the passenger seat looking for the missing man.

Younger said they searched for more than 20 minutes. As they searched the temperature climbed in to the 90s, making dehydration a real possibility for the elderly man.

Hansen gives the credit to Younger for finding the man.

“He pointed the man out to me,” Hansen said “Looking through the brush I thought it was a horse but Officer Younger was right it was the missing man.”

Hansen said he has been part of the LESO program for three years. In that time the two biggest items his department has acquired is a boat and the Humvee.

He says he focus is on getting equipment to help rescue people from floods, tornados and other natural disasters that frequent Oklahoma.

“This Humvee we have is not up armored, it has not more of a tactical advantage than my Tahoe does.” Hansen said.

He went on to say the Humvee has the ground clearance they need to get through high water and to drive over brush. He pointed out that the winch on the front allows them to clear trees from the road so they can perform rescue operations after a tornado.

“Referring to the LESO program Hansen said, “It’s a great program it would be impossible for me to get these items without it, I could not afford them. I am a small agency… I don’t have the budget for these items without this program.”

The elderly man that Hansen and Younger found was returned to his family with only a few scratches on his arms, thanks to prepared police department and a former military Humvee from DLA Disposition Services.