News | March 22, 2021

DLA Aviation employees learn what CUI means to them

By Cathy Hopkins DLA Aviation Public Affairs

In February, Defense Logistics Agency Intelligence published a new controlled unclassified information policy and since then, employees have been trying to figure out how it impacts their daily work.

“DLA employees are already familiar with the need to protect critical information that could be of use to our adversaries through the agency’s critical information list,” said Stephen Robinson, a security manager with DLA Intelligence who works on Defense Supply Center Richmond, Virgina. “If there is an item on the CIL, it is now considered CUI.” 

Employees can find a current copy of the CIL, DOD/DLA CUI Instruction, CUI cover page and DOD CUI Marking Job Aid on the Intelligence at DLA Aviation Eworkplace website (A common access card is required for access.) and should familiarize themselves with CUI categories on the Defense Department CUI Category website. The National Archives CUI website provides additional information.

“I’m urging employees to complete the mandatory Learning Management System course as soon as possible,” he said.  “The course isn’t due in LMS until August but take it early to have an understanding of the additional requirements being placed on all DLA employees now.”  (A common access card is required for access.)

DoD is no longer using For Official Use Only. CUI replaces what was formerly called FOUO.

The course, Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) Training and DLA policy, DLAI 5200.48, outlines how employees determine information that need protection, how they should apply the new markings and designation indicators, as well as standards like encrypting emails containing CUI found in Defense Department Instruction 5200.48.

What is a CUI designation indicator? The CUI designator box tells people reading the email, word document, or slideshow presentation what the DOD component is, the identification of the office, which category is CUI, the distribution/dissemination controls and the point of contact for the information.

It is the employee’s responsibility to determine what categories the information falls under.

“What this means is every time an employee transmits CUI, they will need to label it correctly to include encrypting email transmissions and placing the CUI in the header/footer of the email and adding CUI designation block indicator,” he said.

Robinson said, one way to determine if information needs marked is to ask yourself could it benefit our adversaries.  “I realize it’s a learning curve and I’m here to help,” he said.  

Robinson is in the process of providing an overview of new CUI requirements to various groups throughout DLA Aviation.  If leaders would like to schedule training for their work units, they can contact him via email at stephen.robinson@dla.mil  or by phone at 804-279-1680.In February, Defense Logistics Agency Intelligence published a new controlled unclassified information policy and since then, employees have been trying to figure out how it impacts their daily work.

“DLA employees are already familiar with the need to protect critical information that could be of use to our adversaries through the agency’s critical information list,” said Stephen Robinson, a security manager with DLA Intelligence who works on Defense Supply Center Richmond, Virgina. “If there is an item on the CIL, it is now considered CUI.” 

Employees can find a current copy of the CIL, DOD/DLA CUI Instruction, CUI cover page and DOD CUI Marking Job Aid on the Intelligence at DLA Aviation Eworkplace website (A common access card is required for access.) and should familiarize themselves with CUI categories on the Defense Department CUI Category website. The National Archives CUI website provides additional information.

“I’m urging employees to complete the mandatory Learning Management System course as soon as possible,” he said.  “The course isn’t due in LMS until August but take it early to have an understanding of the additional requirements being placed on all DLA employees now.”  (A common access card is required for access.)

DoD is no longer using For Official Use Only. CUI replaces what was formerly called FOUO.

The course, Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) Training and DLA policy, DLAI 5200.48, outlines how employees determine information that need protection, how they should apply the new markings and designation indicators, as well as standards like encrypting emails containing CUI found in Defense Department Instruction 5200.48.

What is a CUI designation indicator? The CUI designator box tells people reading the email, word document, or slideshow presentation what the DOD component is, the identification of the office, which category is CUI, the distribution/dissemination controls and the point of contact for the information.

It is the employee’s responsibility to determine what categories the information falls under.

“What this means is every time an employee transmits CUI, they will need to label it correctly to include encrypting email transmissions and placing the CUI in the header/footer of the email and adding CUI designation block indicator,” he said.

Robinson said, one way to determine if information needs marked is to ask yourself could it benefit our adversaries.  “I realize it’s a learning curve and I’m here to help,” he said.  

Robinson is in the process of providing an overview of new CUI requirements to various groups throughout DLA Aviation.  If leaders would like to schedule training for their work units, they can contact him via email at stephen.robinson@dla.mil  or by phone at 804-279-1680.