News | Dec. 20, 2021

Unique turn-in items of 2021

By Kelly Burell DLA Disposition Services

Defense Logistics Agency Disposition Services receives and processes the Defense Department’s surplus property, saving billions of taxpayer dollars since its inception in 1972.

Framed flag with 46 stars.
American flag with 46 stars that was received at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. The origin of the flag is unknown but based off of the number of stars on the flag, it is between 109 and 114 years old.
Framed flag with 46 stars.
DLA Disposition Services unique items of 2021
American flag with 46 stars that was received at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. The origin of the flag is unknown but based off of the number of stars on the flag, it is between 109 and 114 years old.
Photo By: Kelly Burell
VIRIN: 211220-D-D0441-205
Throughout the years, unique items have found their way to DLA Disposition Services processing centers and 2021 did not disappoint.

As a new way to highlight these interesting turn-ins, DLA Disposition Services Director Mike Cannon asked the workforce to submit their most unique items for his quarterly Director’s Call.

“I asked the workforce to send in photos of the cool and unique items they received as a fun way to share our story and to show off those challenging, one-off items we receive,” Cannon said.

Forty-five items were sent in from the field during the initial request. Unique items include an American flag with 46 stars, a Nathan’s Hot Dog cart, a lifeguard tower and U.S. Air Force boat.

The American flag was received by DLA Disposition Services field site located on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Tacoma, Washington. The origin of the flag is unknown but based off the number of stars, it is between 109 and 114 years old.

It was evident, based on the number of submissions, the field-site locations enjoyed compiling a list of their most interesting items.

Nathan's hot dog cart.
Nathan’s Hot Dog cart that was received by DSD site San Antonio, Texas.
Nathan's hot dog cart.
DLA Disposition Services unique items of 2021
Nathan’s Hot Dog cart that was received by DSD site San Antonio, Texas.
Photo By: Kelly Burell
VIRIN: 211220-D-D0441-206

“The team had fun putting everything together,” said Nicole Harden, management assistant for DSD Mid-America.

These unique turn-ins describe the large scope of property that DLA Disposition Services processes on a regular basis.

“It tells our story within DLA Disposition Services and then I get to share many of these with people at DLA Headquarters to show them the work we do is not routine or regular,” Cannon added. “We do a valuable service, and we have some very challenging items that we are responsible for.”

Other items featured during the Director’s Call included an environmental backpack toilet from Gimcheon, South Korea, an autonomous unmanned surface vehicle from

Multiple handwritten notes of encouragement displayed on a table
Notes from weapons: Words of encouragement that were found in the stock of a M16 from service members who were once assigned to the weapon. Clockwise from bottom: smiling face scope cover from M110 sniper rifle, a note reading “welcome to the danger zone,” a training note from 2016, a note from 1996, a note of Chicago Cubs winning world series in 2016 and another training note. Center: duty armorer prize money – part of $2 bill marked from Afghanistan 2020.
Multiple handwritten notes of encouragement displayed on a table
DLA Disposition Services Unique Items of 2021
Notes from weapons: Words of encouragement that were found in the stock of a M16 from service members who were once assigned to the weapon. Clockwise from bottom: smiling face scope cover from M110 sniper rifle, a note reading “welcome to the danger zone,” a training note from 2016, a note from 1996, a note of Chicago Cubs winning world series in 2016 and another training note. Center: duty armorer prize money – part of $2 bill marked from Afghanistan 2020.
Photo By: Kelly Burell
VIRIN: 211220-D-D0441-207
Letterkenny, Pennsylvania, animal-shaped pediatric examination tables from Fort Riley, Kansas, and notes of encouragement, that were found stashed in the stock of a M16, from service members who shared a weapon throughout its life cycle, that was turned into Anniston Army Depot, Alabama, for demilitarization.

“Looking back over the years in weapons we sometimes take for granted the business we are in, said Jerrod Kirkpatrick a property disposal specialist at Anniston. “We sometimes forget that the weapons we process daily may have come directly from training or a forward deployed area.”